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Research Opportunity: The ALIGNED study - antidepressant treatment based on person’s genetic makeup

The ALIGNED study may help your patients with depression find the right antidepressant medication.

The George Institute for Global Health, St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney, and collaborating institutions across Australia are seeking participants for a new study looking at whether tailored antidepressant therapy based on individual patient’s genetic makeup can improve remission rates in depressed patients initiating antidepressants by reducing trial-and-error iterations, and better managing side effects.

The ALIGNED study is an investigator-initiated, double-blind randomised-controlled trial of pharmacogenomics-guided therapy versus standard care for people with depression. The study is funded by the Medical Research Future Fund.

For all participants enrolled in the study, the prescribing clinician will be provided with an individualised treatment guide containing antidepressant recommendations to inform choice/dosing of antidepressant therapy for your patient.

Click here to find out more about the study. GP Practice flyer. Introductory letter.

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